Category: Infographic


With the (very long) 2016 election season closing in the next 36 hours or so (we hope), and with a seemingly universal disdain for the process, we look back at a Hail Varsity project from the spring, in primary season. Each year the publication conducts an informal survey of Husker fans, and with stumping and polling and voting on everyone’s minds, we decided to present the data in a Nate-Silver-meets-ESPN-Magazine sort of way.

We produced campaign buttons for Huskers heroes of the past, largely based on the designs of historic pinbacks from the past century. Then we designed survey data with the same visual vocabulary you’d see on political sites.

While we encourage everyone to vote, it’s inadvisable to write-in Tommie Frazier (compelling though it may be).

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I worked with Brandon Vogel on a graphic showing the coaching histories of new Husker football coach Mike Riley’s assistants for the issue of Hail Varsity that hit newsstands this week. He’s got a strong history with almost all of them, and we wanted to show where everyone’s careers intersect.

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Hail Varsity coaching graphic

Hanscom Place Plat

I love finding great design in everyday places. While traveling down an internet wormhole while researching Omaha history, I came across the Douglas County Engineer’s site. It hosts plats and surveys of the whole city. This gem is the original plat George Smith submitted to the city in 1873 after surveying my house’s subdivision. This thing looks like it should have an “X” marking where Red Beard buried his treasure and a notation over the Hanscom Park lagoon reading “HERE BE MONSTERS.” Let me tell you, the plats of west Omaha suburbs have nothing on this.

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I’ve always been a big fan of old maps (especially Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps) for the history and detail they show. But this one is gorgeous. The lettering is fantastic. I love the detail of the compass rose. I also get a kick out of seeing the old names for the numbered streets (Liberty instead of 33rd St.; Madison instead of 32nd Ave.; Delaware instead of 32nd St.; Duane instead of 31st St.; Catherine instead of 30th Ave.; Georgia instead of 29th St.; Virginia instead of what used to be 28th and is now I-480; Mt. Pleasant instead of Pacific St. and Baltimore instead of Hickory St.).

This map may not match contemporary tastes (though there’s certainly a revival in the precise hand lettering Smith used on his map), but it’s interesting to see a very utilitarian object created carefully and in a visually pleasing way. There’s a notion that professional graphic design as we know it originated with the Vignellis, Glasers, Basses and Fletchers of the world. But while they were all in short pants, artists created amazing WPA posters, and before that ethereal lithographs advertising liquor and theaters and bicycles. And before that, craftsmen like George Smith took care care and pride in drafting clerical maps that were unlikely to be seen by more than a handful of real estate and engineering insiders. Today draftsmen digitally export shiny new clerical maps from AutoCAD that are far from anything that anyone would want to hang on a wall, which is exactly what I plan to do with the Hanscom Place plat (perhaps with my addition of a sea serpent in the lagoon).

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Welp, we’ve jumped on the tall graphic bandwagon. Well, that’s not entirely true. We’re late comers to the format, for sure. But we believe that we can convey information well no matter what the package, and for this project, the client wanted a tall graphic. So a tall graphic we delivered.


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Featured graphic design and illustration © 2002-2017 Hanscom Park Studio and/or its clients